Some things are simply meant to happen. Whether it was serendipity, destiny or a remarkable synchronicity of purpose, the creation of Preserve has its roots in a chance encounter resulting in a singular friendship.

It was while writing a column for the Willamette Week some 15 years ago that Harriet and Marge first met. Harriet was the freelance writer attempting a column called the Market Report. Ostensibly it was about ingredient, about the produce of the Northwest and its varieties. Marge was then a home economist with Oregon State University Extension in Washington County. Questioning the facts in Harriet's first column, Marge called the Willamette Week editor. Soon after, Harriet bee lined to Hillsboro in an old Studebacker, wary, but excited to meet her first home economist in the flesh.

What resulted was a friendship that came from somewhat opposite poles of experience. Harriet, the "fast rapping daughter of the Bronx" (as she was dubbed by Karen Brooks of the Oregonian) and Marge, a measured and mild-mannered daughter of the Midwest found a common interest in all things related to the growing and preparation of food. And it was in that arena that they merged and thrived and found similarities both great and small in their friendship.

Time passed, Harriet opened and closed a number of restaurants in the Northwest (Bertie Lou's, Harriet's Eat Now and Groundswell). Marge went on to cement her standing as a skilled educator, completing her career with OSU in Clackamas County. A final convergence of interests brought them together again in the summer of 2005.

Today, Preserve reflects a joining of talents honed by different but compatible life experiences and world views. And we mention this because it may occur to anyone visiting this site that there are different threads, passions and styles. Marge will focus on locating the best web based resources on food preservation and safety, healthy cooking, practical homemaking skills, and sensible consumerism. Harriet will continue her investigation into alternative economies as they relate to the household, community and world. Her writings will be reflections on the practice and principles of sustainability and self reliance within an urban environment.

Together they offer food preservation classes. For both, the effort represents a tangible answer to a life's work. Marge is rediscovering the rationale and rewards in domestic pursuits, and Harriet will continue her musings about one's purpose in the galaxy. Together they will offer fact and fancy, concrete methodology and intuitive vision. Between them they hope to offer skills and service to encourage a move towards simpler, holistic life styles and good stewardship.